Call for Abstract

2nd International Conference on Pollution Control and Sustainable Environment, will be organized around the theme “Exploring New Horizons and Sustainable Technologies for Controlling Pollution”

Pollution Control 2017 is comprised of keynote and speakers sessions on latest cutting edge research designed to offer comprehensive global discussions that address current issues in Pollution Control 2017

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks.

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Bioenergy is the single largest renewable energysource today, providing 10% of world primary energy supply. It plays a crucial role in many developing countries, where it provides basic energy for cooking and space heating, but often at the price of severe health and environmental impacts. The deployment of advanced biomass cook stoves, clean fuels and additional off-grid biomass electricity supply in developing countries are key measures to improve the current situation and achieve universal access to clean energy facilities by 2030.

Biofuels are produced from living organisms or from metabolic by-products (organic or food waste products). In order to be considered a biofuel the fuel must contain over 80 percent renewable materials. Bio-hydrogen may be a potential biofuel available from each cultivation and from waste organic materials. Although element is created from non-renewable technologies like steam reformation of gas (~50% of worldwide H2 supply), rock oil processing (~30%) and chemical change of coal (~20%), chlorophyte and cyanobacteria supply another route to renewable H2 production. Steam reforming of methane (biogas) made by anaerobic digestion of organic waste, are often used for bio-hydrogen also. Bio-plastics are any plastic material that's either bio based, perishable, or options both properties. They’re derived from renewable biomass sources, like vegetable fats and oils, corn starch, or micro-biota. Organic phenomenon is that the production of electrical potentials and currents within/by living organisms. Bioelectric potentials area unit generated by a range of biological processes and customarily zero in strength from one to some hundred millivolts.

  • Track 1-1Solid biomass
  • Track 1-2Bioelectricity
  • Track 1-3Green energy and green power
  • Track 1-4Sewage biomass
  • Track 1-5Bioethanol
  • Track 1-6Biohydrogen

Renewable energy is energy that is generated from natural processes that are continuously replenished.  It is a form of energy that meet our today’s demand of energy without putting them in danger of getting expired or depleted and can be used over and over again.  Renewable energyshould be widely encouraged as it do not cause any harm to the environment and is available widely free of cost. This includes sunlight, geothermal heat, wind, tides, water, and various forms of biomass. This energy cannot be exhausted and is constantly renewed.

There are many forms of renewable energy sources that can be incorporated by countries to stop the use of fossil fuels. Renewable energy does not include any sources that are derived from fossil fuels or waste products. This energy is replenish able and helps us to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and causes no damage to the environment. If we are going to use fossil fuels at a steady rate, they will expire soon and cause adverse effect to our planet.

  • Track 2-1Renewable sources
  • Track 2-2Hydropower
  • Track 2-3Solar energy
  • Track 2-4Geothermal energy
  • Track 2-5Energy storage
  • Track 3-1Types of Light Sources
  • Track 3-2Types of Light Pollution
  • Track 3-3Effects on Environment
  • Track 4-1Air pollution
  • Track 4-2Agricultural pollution
  • Track 4-3Chemical pollution
  • Track 4-4Sea pollution
  • Track 4-5Groundwater pollution
  • Track 4-6Coal pollution
  • Track 4-7River pollution
  • Track 4-8Radioactive pollution
  • Track 4-9Sound pollution
  • Track 4-10Water pollution
  • Track 4-11Wind power
  • Track 5-1Environmental management
  • Track 5-2Environmental degradation
  • Track 5-3Environmental regulations
  • Track 5-4Environmental crisis
  • Track 5-5Environmental pollutants
  • Track 6-1Air quality monitoring
  • Track 6-2Air quality engineering
  • Track 6-3Pollution control equipment
  • Track 6-4Diffusion of pollutants in air
  • Track 6-5Vegetation
  • Track 6-6Regulations governing air pollution
  • Track 6-7Air pollutants causing global warming
  • Track 6-8Gaseous emissions
  • Track 6-9Particulate emission
  • Track 7-1Causes of water pollution
  • Track 7-2Sources of waste water
  • Track 7-3Treatment of waste water
  • Track 7-4Water treatment technologies
  • Track 7-5Water purification
  • Track 7-6Quality indicators
  • Track 7-7Regulations governing water pollution
  • Track 8-1Classification, generation rate and composition of solid wastes
  • Track 8-2Functional elements of solid waste management Program
  • Track 8-3Hazardous solid wastes management
  • Track 8-4Techniques to reduce hazardous waste quantities
  • Track 8-5Regulations governing solid and hazardous wastes
  • Track 9-1Sewage
  • Track 9-2Toxic chemicals from industries
  • Track 9-3Hazardous solid wastes management
  • Track 9-4Land runoff
  • Track 9-5Large scale oil spills
  • Track 9-6Ocean mining
  • Track 9-7Littering
  • Track 9-8Effect of toxic wastes on marine animals
  • Track 10-1Gaseous pollutants
  • Track 10-2Coal-fired power plants
  • Track 10-3Petrochemical plants
  • Track 10-4Nuclear waste
  • Track 10-5Industrial solid and hazardous waste
  • Track 10-6Particulate matter in gaseous emissions
  • Track 10-7Pollution control through efficient combustion technology
  • Track 10-8Pollution control in industrial processes
  • Track 10-9Pollution control in transportation
  • Track 11-1Waste handling and transport
  • Track 11-2Disposal solutions
  • Track 11-3Recycling
  • Track 11-4Energy Recovering
  • Track 11-5Waste treatment technologies
  • Track 11-6Developments in waste management
  • Track 12-1Wireless sensors
  • Track 12-2Nanotechnology
  • Track 12-3Laser methods
  • Track 12-4Spectroscopic monitoring techniques
  • Track 12-5Chemical methods
  • Track 12-6Scrubbers
  • Track 12-7Cyclones & Multi cyclones
  • Track 12-8Bag filters
  • Track 12-9Air ventilation
  • Track 13-1Natural sources
  • Track 13-2Human-made sources
  • Track 13-3Motor vehicle emissions
  • Track 13-4Combustion
  • Track 13-5Construction
  • Track 13-6Nuclear waste
  • Track 13-7Power plants
  • Track 13-8Petrochemical plants
  • Track 13-9Hazardous wastes
  • Track 14-1Respiratory disease
  • Track 14-2Cardiovascular disease
  • Track 14-3Throat inflammation
  • Track 14-4Skin irritations and rashes
  • Track 14-5Neurological problems
  • Track 15-1Armed conflicts/military action
  • Track 15-2Petroleum refineries
  • Track 15-3Technology
  • Track 15-4Agriculture
  • Track 15-5Energy industry
  • Track 15-6Manufactured products
  • Track 15-7Mining
  • Track 15-8Transport
  • Track 15-9Metals & plastics production factories
  • Track 16-1Global sustainable development goals
  • Track 16-2Environmental dimensions
  • Track 16-3Economic dimension
  • Track 16-4Social dimension
  • Track 16-5Avoidance and reduction methods