Scientific Program

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Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Walid Elshorbagy

MWH Global-Middle East, United Arab Emirates

Keynote: Quantifying the future impacts of potential desalination technologies in the Arabian Gulf upon the Gulf environment

Time : 09:30 - 10:00

OMICS International Pollution Control 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Walid Elshorbagy photo
Biography:

Walid Elshorbagy is a Professor and Technical Lead in MWH Global - Middle East with 30 years’ experience in the area of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering. Before he joined MWH in June 2015 and while his tenure of 19 years in the UAE University, he conducted several studies in collaboration with the industry related to coastal hydrodynamics, EIA, water resources management, hydraulics, water quality, and wastewater treatment. His research outcomes have been documented in more than 100 publications.

Abstract:

Due to the arid environment and scarcity of natural renewable water resources in the Arabian Gulf (AG) area, most Gulf countries heavily rely on desalination for their domestic supplies. Such countries have major future development plans and expect to significantly extend their desalination capacities to meet the eventual growing water demands. The impact of massive future effluents from coastal desalination plants and other major coastal industries on the salinity and temperature of the AG has always been a concern and a constraint in future extension and development. A recent study utilized a 3D hydrodynamic model to evaluate the long term changes of the AG salinity and temperature (up to year 2080) considering the aforementioned effluents superimposed with climate change projections of the atmospheric ocean general circulation climate models (AOGCM) in a multi-model approach. The used model was calibrated against short-term records of water levels and currents and against long term records of evaporation, salinity, and temperature. The near-shore long term variability at the desalination intakes; representing observational points in the computational domain, was quantitatively assessed for a number of selected development scenarios. The impacts of future coastal effluents on the AG salinity and temperature were found very small and localized near the effluent points when compared to impacts of climate change. Future operational costs of desalinated water produced by four main desalination technologies (MSF, MED, RO, and Hybrid) were estimated based on the projected changes of ambient coastal conditions. The estimated costs were considered in calculating surrogate indicators referred to as Least Negatively Impacted (LNI) technology produced at major desalination plants in all Gulf countries. MED was found to be the technology of least LNI at all AG locations followed by different technologies depending on the location due to its different circulation conditions.

OMICS International Pollution Control 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker M V Raghavendra Rao  photo
Biography:

M V Raghavendra Rao, PhD, worked as Professor of microbiology, parasitology, immunology and Epidemiology in many universities in India, China, Nepal, Libya, and Philippines. Currently, he is working at Avalon University School of Medicine, Curacao, Netherland Antilles. He has more than 40 years of teaching and research experience. He supervised 3 students for PhD, and 8 students for MPhil. He authored 18 text books. Three universities appointed him as their advisor and 3 universities acknowledged him with fellowships.

Abstract:

Heavy metals are essential to normal development of organ systems as well as body metabolism. These are useful to the growth of tissues, synthesis and activity. Many heavy metals like copper, zinc, manganese, chromium, etc., are important components of biochemical functions. However heavy metals at higher concentrations prove to be hazardous affecting life and life processes. Man has always been exposed to heavy metals through natural concentration in soil and water. Metals leached from eating from utensils and vessels used for cooking increased the risk. The emergence of the industrial age and large scale mining brought occupational hazards caused by various toxic metals. Metallic constituents of pesticides and therapeutic agents are additional sources of hazardous exposure. The burning of fossil fuels containing heavy metals and the addition of tetra ethyl lead to gasoline have now become the major sources of heavy metal poisoning, adding to environmental pollution, with the increased usage of chemicals in modern technology, the concentration of the metals is increasing in the environment. Heavy metals are known to affect reproduction and development of animals. Trans placental movement of methyl mercury in women caused feto- toxicity. Exposure to heavy metals caused more damage to fetus than to mother. Lead crosses the placenta and causes abortion and fetal loss. Increased maternal exposure to lead resulted in the increased lead content in fetus and new born in pregnant women. Heavy metals, finding entry in to an organism induce biochemical and metabolic changes. Man today is living in a world created by him that is becoming more and more hostile every day owing to pollution. Is it possible for us to live without pesticides, without heavy metals, and without radioactive substances and vehicles? It is just not possible.

  • Track 1: Pollution
    Track 2: Environmental Pollution
    Track 3: Air Pollution
Speaker
Biography:

Enrique M. Ostrea, Jr. is a full tenured Professor of Pediatrics at Wayne State University and neonatologist at Children’s Hospital of Michigan and Hutzel Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. His research focuses on exposure of pregnant women to environmental pollutions, specifically pesticides and lead and the effect on the neurobehavioral development of the child. He has published more than 80 papers in peer reviewed journals. He has also developed the meconium drug test to detect exposure of the fetus to illicit and licit drugs, alcohol, nicotine and environmental pesticides and heavy metals such as lead.

Abstract:

Objective: To determine the prevalence and sources of high lead (Pb) exposure among children in Bulacan, Philippines. Methods: 150 children (6-7 years old) and their caregivers were studied. Lead was analyzed in children hair and deciduous teeth. Sources of lead exposure were determined by caregiver interview and Pb analysis of house soil, drinking water, air and water from 7 Bulacan rivers. Results: Lead was positive in 91.3% of children's hair (MC or median concentration = 8.9 ug/g), in 42.6 % of teeth (MC = 0.007 ug/mg in positive samples), in 100% of soil (MC = 27.1 mg/kg), in 21% of air (MC = 0 ug/Ncm; range = 0 - 0.10), in 4% of house water (MC = 0.0 ppm range = 0 - 40). There was a significant correlation between Pb in children's hair and soil (p=0.017) and between Pb in house water and outdoor air (p=0.005). No significant correlation between Pb in children's hair & teeth. None of potential sources of Pb from interview were related to lead exposure in the children. Water from 7 Bulacan rivers was 100% positive for lead (MC = 70.00 ppb). Widespread flooding with river overflow occurred in Bulacan in 2009. Conclusion: High lead exposure in children in Bulacan is likely from soil contaminated by lead polluted rivers during flooding. In areas where flooding is common, alluvial and riparian soils from polluted rivers are important sources of lead exposure in children.

Hatem Abou-Senna

University of Central Florida, USA

Title: Quantifying the effects of vehicular driving cycles on air quality

Time : 11:10-11:35

Speaker
Biography:

Hatem Abou-Senna is an Assistant Professor and the Transportation and Air Quality Program Director for the Transportation Center (CATSS) at UCF. He holds Bachelor and Master Degrees in Civil Engineering from Cairo University as well as Masters and PhD degrees in Transportation Engineering from UCF and has been a registered as Professional Engineer in Florida since 2006. He has over 20 years of experience in traffic engineering and transportation planning. He specializes in microscopic traffic simulation, transportation modeling, traffic impact studies & transportation air quality impacts. He has published over 30 peer-reviewed journal and conference papers.

Abstract:

Transportation is one of the primary sources of air pollution and GHG emissions. On-road mobile sources account for a third of the total air pollution in the US. Furthermore, the type of analysis and the level of detail utilized (macroscopic or microscopic) to calculate traffic emissions affect the results extensively. Traditional methods for creating emission inventories utilized annual average estimates. Instead, travel demand models were utilized to provide an intermediate level of detail using daily values. Currently, more accuracy has been established using microscopic analyses through the reduction of time and distance scales and utilizing second-by-second operations. The need to accurately quantify transportation-related emissions from vehicles is essential. The latest United States Environmental Protection Agency mobile source emissions model, MOVES can estimate vehicle emissions on a second-by-second basis creating the opportunity to integrate it with a microscopic traffic simulation model (VISSIM). This research analyzed different levels of detail for predicting emissions from vehicles and shows how the various approaches affect predicted emissions of CO, NOx, PM and CO2. The results demonstrated that vehicle activity characterization in terms of different driving behaviors was shown to have a significant impact on air quality. Specifically, emission rates were found to be highly sensitive to stop-and-go traffic and the associated driving cycles of acceleration, deceleration, and frequent braking/coasting and idling. Obtaining accurate and comprehensive operating mode distributions on a second-by-second basis is essential for predicting emissions. The proposed emission rate estimation process can provide policymakers with more accurate information when deciding on environmental transport policies for air pollution control.

Speaker
Biography:

Hany A Elazab was awarded his PhD degree in Chemical Engineering in 2013. He is a (VCU) Alumni Life Member, a member in several professional and scientific affiliations and also a member by invitation in Phi Kappa Phi International Honor Society (PKP) and in Golden Key International Honor Society in USA as recognition for his academic achievements during his PhD study. Then, he joined Military Technical College (MTC) as a lecturer in Chemical Engineering Department until he was retired from the Egyptian Armed Forces as a Lieutenant Colonel in 2015. He had the honor to join the British University in Egypt (BUE) as an Assistant Professor (Lecturer) in the Faculty of Engineering in the Chemical Engineering Department since September 2015.

Abstract:

Metal oxides and magnetic nanoparticles have been recognized as a class of nanostructured materials of current interest due to its well-known outstanding physical and chemical properties; especially when used in combination with other metal nano-particles. These kinds of nanostructured materials play an important role in many aspects of research ranging from catalysis and biology to material science, advanced technological, medical applications, and green chemistry. The metal oxide nano catalysts are also of great importance in improving the thermal-catalytic decomposition performance. The advanced and unique magnetic, electronic, and catalytic properties of the materials in the nano scale attracted research centers to investigate this area of science deeply. In the field of catalysis; separation of catalysts is a vital step especially in medical and therapeutic applications and mainly in cross coupling reactions. The catalytic effect of magnetic nanoparticles is considered one of the hot topics as an important area of research due to its unique role including but not limited to huge industrial applications. It is well known that one of the important issues is catalyst separation. The catalyst that can’t be recovered or recycled from the reaction mixture is generally not preferred in chemical industry even if it is a highly active catalyst. Recently, there has been an increasing trend towards using these kinds of magnetically recoverable nanomaterials in order to develop green chemical synthetic processes. By using magnetic nanoparticles as a support; it is easy to recover these catalysts by applying a strong external magnetic field to make use of the paramagnetic character of these kinds of supports.

Speaker
Biography:

Ines Bouaziz has completed her PhD in 2014. She prepared her PhD under the supervision of the University Paul Sabatier of Toulouse (Pr. K. Groenen Serrano) and the National Engineering School at the Sfax University in Tunisia (Pr. R. Abdelhedi). The aim of her works was to study the coupling of adsorption and electrochemistry for the treatment of organic pollutants discharged in waste waters. She showed that sawdust used as adsorbent can be totally regenerated under polarization contrary to activated carbon. Her results were presented in three communications in international meeting and two publications in international journals.

Abstract:

Phenolic compounds are present in wastewater of many industrial sectors. Aromatic compounds, in particular those having a quinonic structure, are highly toxic. Electrochemical methods seem to be promising, in particular when using the boron doped diamond (BDD) anode. Although direct electro-oxidation possesses many advantages, its efficiency is limited for the treatment of dilute solutions because of mass-transfer limitations. To overcome these limitations, an alternative approach that has been suggested here is the coupling of electrochemistry with a pre-concentration step to render it more amenable to electrochemical treatment; an efficient method for the pre-concentration of pollutants is adsorption. In the present work, the treatment of phenol solution by coupling adsorption onto adsorbents and electrochemical oxidation on BDD anode has been studied. The adsorbents chosen were a commercial activated carbon with a high specific area and sawdust made from industrial waste. The maximum adsorption capacity of the activated carbon is greater than the one obtained with sawdust. However, the regeneration efficiency after 1 cycle of adsorption and regeneration is only 59% for activated carbon. Indeed, the electropolymerization of the strongly adsorbed phenol has occurred. This phenomenon can explain the deterioration in performance of activated carbon by the obstruction of its pores during the electrolysis. By contrast, there was an increase in the adsorption capacity of the sawdust (the regeneration efficiency is more than 100%). This study demonstrated that sawdust is a promising adsorbent for the treatment of dilute solution containing phenolic compounds by adsorption onto sawdust-electrochemical degradation coupling.

Speaker
Biography:

Bonamali Pal has completed his PhD from Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai, India and Postdoctoral studies (7.5 years) from Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kushu Institute of Technology, Catalysis Research Center, Hokkaido University, Japan. He is the Head and Professor of School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Thapar University, Patiala, Punjab, a premier Engineering Institute of repute in North India. He has published 85 SCI research papers in American Chemical Society, Royal Society of Chemistry and Elsevier Science etc.

Abstract:

This talk will demonstrate the preparation, characterization and photo catalytic activities of different size and shape of metal-TiO2 Nano catalysts for advanced oxidative degradation of toxic pesticides, dyes, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and photo killing of pathogenic and agrobacteria bacteria present in wastewater and agricultural land under UV-visible and sun light irradiation. The various crystal phases of titania and its different anisotropic shapes and sizes exhibit high photo catalytic activity will be presented in this lecture. It is highly desirable to have full control of the design and fabrication of specific catalyst-co-catalyst interfacial junctions with specific metal NPs geometries in order to tune activity and selectivity of many chemical reactions. It revealed that this geometric asymmetry and size (scheme 1) of Nano catalysts and co-catalysts (Fe, Au, Ag and Cu) nanoparticles remarkably modify the photo catalytic and catalytic activity as compared to bulk materials. For example, Ag/Fe-TiO2 exhibited the highest rate for the oxidative degradation of imidacloprid methyl parathion, dyes and pyrene and their probable pathway for complete mineralization to various intermediates photoproducts to CO2 and fate of different heteroatoms present in these pollutants under direct sunlight (40-50 mW/cm2) exposure will be discussed for plausible applications.

Taehoon Koh

Korea Railroad Research Institute, South Korea

Title: New microwave thermal desorption technology for the remediation of oil-contaminated soil

Time : 12:50-13:15

Speaker
Biography:

Taehoon Koh has completed his PhD from Purdue University (US). He is a Civil Engineer and Chief Researcher of an advanced materials research team focusing on new construction materials and methods. Especially, he has developed eco-friendly construction materials (concrete), fast construction technology for concrete, and low-carbon remediation technology for soil. He has published more than 90 technical papers, registered over 20 patents, and received paper awards and research awards.

Abstract:

In this study, microwave thermal desorption technology was used to treat the oil-contaminated soil, which has been newly developed in Korea. This technology uses microwave absorber in the microwave thermal desorption system in order to effectively develop the microwave heating temperature to treat the oil-contaminated soil. This technology can substantially reduce the remediation cost of oil-polluted soil with fast remediation time and low electric power consumption. From a series of field demonstrations, it is found that this technology can rapidly complete the remediation process of the oil-contaminated soil from the oil spill areas with high efficiency.

M V Raghavendra Rao

Avalon University School of Medicine, USA

Title: Medical research – Scorpion as model

Time : 14:00-14:25

Speaker
Biography:

M V Raghavendra Rao, PhD, worked as Professor of microbiology, parasitology, immunology and Epidemiology in many universities in India, China, Nepal, Libya, and Philippines. Currently, he is working at Avalon University School of Medicine, Curacao, Netherland Antilles. He has more than 40 years of teaching and research experience. He supervised 3 students for PhD, and 8 students for MPhil. He authored 18 text books. Three universities appointed him as their advisor and 3 universities acknowledged him with fellowships.

Abstract:

Man today is living in a world created by him that is becoming more and more hostile every day owing to pollution. The subtle effect of thalidomide tragedy resulting in phocomalia, apoda, etc., in the offspring led to untold miseries. There are similar good number of cases of fetal deaths, still births, terratogenices, etc., in the young ones of mothers exposed to toxicants like pesticides, heavy metal radiation, etc. Can we save innocent lives growing in the wombs of mother from becoming the victims of hostile environment that we cannot avoid? This was the question that was prompted me to choose the topic of my research. Doing research with human subjects is illegal and unethical. So I have to go to non-human material which simulates human being. To study the long term effects of the toxicants on the fetal development. Rats have 21, rabbits have 30, and dog has 60 days of gestation period. Whereas gestation period is long as in case of sheep, monkeys, elephants; they are not available because of cost procurement and maintenance. So, in this situation, scorpion comes handy, cheap, available, viable and reliable, with viviparity and long gestation period of little over 10 months. Hence, scorpion was chosen as a medical research model. It is found in my research that by administering the chelating agents like BAL to the heavy metal exposed mothers, the adverse effects of mercury and lead on both mother and the fetus could be elevated.

Eltayeb Tayrab

University of Bisha, Saudi Arabia

Title: Human mercury exposure associated with artisanal gold miners in Sudan

Time : 14:25-14:50

Speaker
Biography:

Eltayeb Tayrab has completed his PhD from National Ribat University in Sudan. He published 26 papers in regional and some reputed journals. He also published 2 books; one was published in Germany and the other was accepted by the National Ribat University as academic book for the students of Medical Laboratory Sciences. He supervised for 28 master degrees. He is the director of laboratory of Reproductive Health Care Center in Khartoum. He has been working for 25 years in Ribat University Hospital, Sudan. He is currently associate professor of chemical pathology at University of Bisha-Saudi Arabia, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences.

Abstract:

Background: Mercury concentration in the blood is one of mercury exposure biomarkers. This study was conducted in Abuhamed mining area in Sudan, during the period from August 2012 to November 2014. Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate serum mercury levels and to assess lung functions in artisanal gold miners. Material & Methods: The study included 123 subjects, of them 83 were working in the gold mining area, beside 50 healthy volunteers from Khartoum State, as control group. Serum mercury was measured by direct mercury analyzer (DMA-80). Lung function tests were done with a portable spirometer. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics version 20. Results: The study observed significant increase in serum mercury levels in the gold miners, when compared with control group; 24.9±32.24 mg/l versus 1.40±0.94 mg/l with P value (0.000). The mean forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) in the gold miners was 3.24±0.57 versus 3.40±0.39 in the control group, while the mean forced vital capacity (FVC) in the mercury exposed miners was 3.7±0.69 versus 3.86±0.60 in non-exposed control group. The FEV1/FVC ratio in the exposed men was 86% versus 89% in the control group. Conclusion: Serum mercury levels significantly increases in the traditional gold miners working in Abuhamed, while forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) decreases.

Speaker
Biography:

Meral Topcu Sulak received his MSc from Department of Chemistry in the fields of analytical chemistry and a PhD in Environmental Engineering from Gebze Institute of Technology. Currently, she is working as an Associated Professor of Environmental Engineering, Karabuk University. Her research interest includes water quality, underground water quality, wastewater treatment and biosorption.

Abstract:

In this study, the quality of water resources especially used for drinking and daily life is evaluated. To make a convenient assessment, all of the villages were considered. It is very important to provide clear and healthy water to people to prevent disease and maintain health. In history, water resources were only considered by bacteriological analysis but with improving technology and industry, chemical and physical parameters have become very important. pH, sulfate concentrations, total dissolved sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, manganese, iron, cadmium, copper, arsenic, zinc, chromium and lead were evaluated to clarify concerns about the quality and safety of water used for drinking purposes in Western Black Sea, Turkey. For this purpose, water samples were collected from different cities, Karabuk, Bartın and Zonguldak during in 2011. In our region, there is an important steel and iron industry, and also some poultry farms. Addition to this, there is not enough treatment plant in region, so water pollution is a very serious environmental problem. One of the purposes of this study is to compose an inventory about water quality in Karabuk. With this purpose all the villages were evaluated one by one both in bacteriological and physical parameters. According to results, some of the villages have not got an acceptable drinking water resource.

  • Track 4: Water Pollution
    Track 6: Marine Pollution
    Track 7: Industrial Pollution

Session Introduction

Edwin D Thangam

Dr MGR Educational and Research Institute University, India

Title: Reduction of total chromium in textile industry effluent

Time : 15:15-15:40

Speaker
Biography:

Edwin D Thangam is a faculty of Annamalai University. He is a hardworking academician and researcher with adequate experience in industry, academics and real time construction consultancy projects. He is specialized in Geotechnical Engineering at PG level and is currently pursuing Doctoral Studies in Environmental Engineering. He is involved in real time consultancy projects on constructions, interiors, structure, sustainability, etc.

Abstract:

Waste water released from industries is a major concern for environmentalists these days. Industrial effluents contain various toxic metals, harmful gases and several organic and inorganic compounds. The discharge of these untreated toxic effluents has deteriorated the natural flora and fauna and poses a risk to human health. The long-term consequences of exposure also cause fatal diseases like cancer, delayed nervous responses, mutagenic changes, neurological disorders, etc., in humans. Industrial effluent containing chromium and aromatic compounds like phenol are discharged by the industrial processes of wood preserving, metal finishing, petroleum refining, leather tanning and finishing, paint and ink formulation, pulp and paper industry, textile industry, pharmaceutical industry and automobile parts manufacturing industry. In order to remove these pollutants from the effluent, expensive chemical and physical processes like ionization, adsorption, ion exchange, membrane filtration, chemical oxidation, etc., are used. Most of these processes are highly energy consuming, non-economic and release effluent waste water which is detrimental to the environment. Recently biotechnological processes have been reported as alternative expensive treatment methods. Biological methods are simple as well as eco-friendly and have the potential to completely reduce and degrade the pollutants under aerobic or anaerobic conditions at relatively low capital and operating cost. Textile and Clothing (T&C) is one of the largest and oldest industries present globally. However, the textile industry is considered to be one of the biggest threats to the environment. The various processes carried out in the textile industries produce large amounts of gas, liquid and solid wastes. The removal of Cr from textile industry wastewater by chemical precipitation using ferric chloride was investigated in the present study. The ferric chloride was able to precipitate out Cr as well as coloring matter from the wastewater. The precipitation was found to be highly dependent on both pH and dose of iron salt used. The Cr removal was effective under highly alkaline conditions above pH 10 and the color removal was effective in the pH range of 3.0-6.0. The chemical precipitation performed at pH 12, The experiments showed the Cr reduction from 564 mg/l to a dischargeable level of 2mg/l after treatment with ferric chloride at pH 12. The study claims that the ferric chloride can be used effectively to remove phenols from textile industry.

Speaker
Biography:

Tochukwu Ezechi Ebe has completed her PhD from Federal University of Technology, P.M.B.1526 Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria. She is a Lecturer in the Department of Environmental Technology of the same institution. She has published 23 papers in related field in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Human activities have become a major source of environmental pollution especially on the issue of water pollution which includes surface and ground water. This research was aimed at studying the effect of human activities such as indiscriminate defecation, fermentation of cassava tubers etc on the water quality of Onuakpaka stream and selected ground water in Ogwuama community of Ahiazu, Imo State, Nigeria. Water samples were collected in triplicates each with sterile containers from upstream, downstream and ground water. All the samples were analyzed using standard method. The result showed that the pH of samples collected from the upstream and downstream were more acidic (5.70 and 5.90 respectively) than the ground water (6.06). Also, the upstream and downstream have high turbidity of 14.76 and 15.40 respectively. More also, dissolved oxygen in the stream samples were below the World Health Organization and Federal Ministry of Environment standards while the ground water samples were within the standard. Also there were presence of fecal counts and Escherichia coli in all the samples collected (8.00 in ground water, 13.00 in the upstream and 23.00 downstream) this may be due to indiscriminate defecation. Furthermore, the temperature, conductivity, total dissolved oxygen etc. were within the standard in all the samples collected. Conclusively, the presence of fecal contaminant and Escherichia coli signifies that the water is highly polluted and unfit for drinking and domestic work. This leads to great danger to human health in this community.

Speaker
Biography:

Soha S M Mostafa is a Phycologist, with over 20-years research experience in the area of applied phycology. Main fields of work include: Isolation and characterization of microalgae from different environments; phycoremediation of agro-industrial effluents and domestic wastewater into biodiesel and biofertilizers production; seawater desalination; bio-precipitation of heavy metals via cyanobacterial off-gases; phytohormones, pigments, antioxidant, anticancer and other bioactive compounds production from algae; using microalgae in controlling Schistosoma mansoni, nematode, fungal and viral plant diseases. He was a guest author in the European online publication “INTECH” with a chapter entitled " Micro-algal Biotechnology: Prospects and Applications" on Plant Science (2012).

Abstract:

The dual role of cyanobacteria in wastewater phycoremediation for sustainable biomass production combined with biorefinery approach is a feasible option. Phycoremediation is the process of employing algae for removing excess nutrient load from wastewater and subsequently diminish the pollution load. Industrial processes for olive production generate a considerable amount of oil waste water, designated "olive mill wastewater" (OMW) known as alpechin, it caused serious environmental problems particularly in the Mediterranean areas where it is generated in huge quantities in short periods of time. The objective of this research was to study the ability of three cyanobacteria strains (Nostoc muscorum, Anabaena oryzae and Spirulina platensis) to grow, either individually or in a mixture, on relatively high olive mill wastewater (OMW) concentrations of 50, 75 and 100%. The highest phenolic compounds biodegradability and maximum biomass production have been taken as main criteria in the selection of the best treatment in this study. Best results of all growth parameters and phenolic compounds degradation were obtained by mixed culture and 50% OMW and these parameters make the potential of bio-formulating such these wastes into sources for olive trees bio-organic fertilizer is the most preferable methods for the agro-sustainable system. The cultivated algal species are suggested to be a promising feedstock for biofuel (biodiesel or bioethanol), food and animal feed production according to the biochemical composition.

Speaker
Biography:

Azeez L obtained his PhD in 2013 from Ladoke Akintola University of Technology. He is currently a Lecturer I in the Department of Chemical Sciences, Osun State University. He has published 24 articles in learned journals with one accepted in the Journal of Nanostructure in Chemistry and he is currently into the use of nanoparticle for the improvement of nutritional compositions of vegetables. He is presently serving as the Managing Editor of Fountain Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences and Public Relation Officer of Chemical Society of Nigeria, Osun State Branch.

Abstract:

This study determined concentrations of toxic pollutants, volatile organic compounds and meteorological parameters in three sampling locations (SL1, SL2 and SL3) at Ilupeju industrial Estate. Average concentrations of toxic pollutants CO (14.70 ppm), NO2 (0.88 ppm), and SO2 (0.55 ppm) and O3 (17.67 ppb) were measured. They were temperature, wind speed, pressure and relative humidity dependent. In terms of air quality, unhealthy air quality was obtained for CO, NO2 and SO2 while O3 gave a good air quality. Of seventeen VOCs species belonging to alkane, alkene, aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons measured, m/p - xylene was the most abundant species accounting for 16.28%, 11.66% and 14.06% at SL1, SL2 and SL3 respectively. Different ratios such as toluene/m,p – xylene, Σ Xylene/CO, trichloroethene/CO and tetrachloroethene/CO indicated solvent related emissions from these locations while Benzene/Toluene ratio indicated a traffic related emission. m/p - xylene and propene were the major contributors to O3 formation at SL1, SL2 and SL3 respectively. Ozone determined was VOC sensitive at all locations. Factor analysis using principal component analysis suggested traffic and industrial related emission sources for toxic pollutants and these with solvent evaporation as sources for VOCs.

Speaker
Biography:

Njoku-Tony Roseline Feechi is a PhD holder in Medical Parasitology. She is currently a Lecturer at the Department of Environmental Sciences (Pollution Control Option) at Federal University of Technology Owerri, Nigeria. She is focusing her research interest in pollution control and elimination of neglected tropical diseases.

Abstract:

Gas flaring is a major contributor to the emission of toxic gases and other gaseous pollutants into the atmosphere. This study investigates the impact of gas flare on leaves of Cassava around Utorogu gas plant, Delta State. Three sampling locations were chosen at 1 km, 2 km and 3 km consecutively from the gas flare stack and a control location at Orerokpe. Ambient air quality was determined for methane (CH4) (ppm), oxide of sulphur (SOx) (ppm), oxide of nitrogen (NOx) (ppm), carbon monoxide (CO) (ppm), and hydrogen sulphide (H2S) (ppm). Leaves collected were taken to the laboratory for analysis. Relative leaf water content (RLWC) (%), total chlorophyll content (TCC) (mg/m3), leaf extract pH (LEP) (mol/liter) and ascobic acid content (AAC) (mg) were determined under standard laboratory methods. Ensuing data were subjected to standard statistical analysis. Results showed that CH4 varied from 38.00-92.00 ppm, H2S from 0.05-1.20 ppm, CO from 11.00-26.40 ppm, SO2 from 252.00-340.00 ppm and NO2 from 82.00-190.00 ppm. RLWC varied from 30.50-56.33, TCC varied from 1.98-4.66, LEP varied from 4.50-7.00 mol/litre and AAC varied from 0.03-0.15. It was revealed that NOx, SOx and CO exceeded NESREA’s short-term tolerance limits for ambient air pollutants of (40-60) ppm, 100 ppm, and 10 ppm respectively. This shows that air pollutants exerted significant inhibitory influence on biochemical activities of the leaf studied. Environmental regulatory agencies and oil exploration companies should help reduce gas flaring to avoid damages to crop production.

Speaker
Biography:

Seyedtaghi Mirmohammadi has earned his PhD degree in Environmental Technology (Indoor Air Pollution) from University Science Malaysia, Malaysia (2010). He is Assistant Professor at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Occupational Health in Iran. He served as Deputy Dean for Health Affairs (7/2010-11/2011), University Chancellor Consultant for Toxicants Safety (/52010-9/2012). He published more than 20 refereed papers by peer reviewed journals. His research interests are air quality control modeling, toxicology and human exposure, indoor air pollution assessment, indoor air analyzing and control, particle technology. He currently guides several postgraduate students.

Abstract:

Manganese (Mn) is used as raw material for melting process in ferrous foundry and it is considered as a hazardous neurotoxic substance. The furnace-men and melting department workers are potentially exposed to manganese particles or fume in the workplace which accumulates in their central nervous system and neurological disorder observed for exposed workers. The objective of the research was to investigate the sources and levels of manganese exposure in the foundry by correlation of blood-manganese (B-Mn) and air-manganese (air-Mn) measurement. Air-Mn and B-Mn were measured involving workers (case=35, control=35) who worked in a big size foundry during one year. The standard method of OSHA-ID121 was used for air and blood assessment and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was carried out for air and blood sample analysis. The air sampling results revealed that there is a high exposure to manganese (4.5 mg/m3) in the workplace compared to NIOSH time weighted average (Reference TWA=1 mg/m3). The average blood Mn concentration were 2.745 and 274.85 µg/l for less than three months (n=35) and 3-12 months working experience (n=35), respectively; it implies that there is a high accumulation of manganese in their blood. Risk assessment based on mutual evaluations of B-Mn and air-Mn seems to be valid in the understanding of workers' hazard. Our study indicates that B-Mn assessment by AAS may be a precious procedure for estimation of exposure condition based on working experience (more than 3 months).